Hope, one of the great needs for human existence.

Psalm 32

1/31/2018

 

Synopsis:

 

  • David pronounces a blessing on those who seek after God.
  • He admits that when he was silent toward God his bones wasted away from groaning all day.
  • His strength was sapped as though by a hot Summer day.
  • When he realized it was from his sin, he asked God’s forgiveness.
  • God took his sin and forgave him.
  • God calls upon him to not be like a horse or mule that has to be guided with a bit and bridle.
  • “Many are the woes of the wicked, but the Lord’s unfailing love surrounds the one who trusts in Him.” (verse 10)
  • David exhorts us to be glad and sing.

 

Reaction:

 

This must have been written shortly after Nathan, the prophet, confronted David about his illicit affair with Bathsheba. He also gave him the message from God that her firstborn son would die.

This upset him terribly and he went into a time of morning and fasting, in an effort to change the mind of God.

When the son was born and died shortly thereafter, he surprised everyone when arose from his bed, bathed, ate his fill and began to sing and praise God. When asked why he was not mourning the child’s death, he responded that God kept his word and his punishment was over and he needed to get on with his life.

I don’t see that it is any different today. When I make irresponsible goofs and disappoint God, I need to accept His chastisement, and get on with my life.

I got to wandering about these psalms of David. Wandering how they would be sung. So, I did a little research on the internet. I discovered that there is a lot more to them than appears on the surface!

Check out this info that I found:

This is from an article about his work, by Uri, an Israeli Hebrew teacher:

The music in the words:

Tunes of Psalms are reverberating in my mind while I am writing. Without words, melodies only. This music is older than any song I have ever heard, but it is probable that it was not played for thousands of years. Maybe never. Not even by King David, the author of these Psalms.
I am talking about the sounds of God’s words that were translated to music.  Responsible for this creation are two people: Uri Harel, an Israeli Hebrew & Bible teacher, and Kevin Zadai, a musician from Phoenix, Arizona. The two developed a method to replace the letters of the Hebrew Alef-Bet by musical notes. They used synthesizers to create hymns of praise made of actual Psalms. The result is 11 Psalms that were recorded onto a CD and published under the name “Music from God”.  What catches the ear is the melodic harmony. The notes express the Alef-Bet and supposedly are not connected, but in some magical way they create melodies that sound like the wind, full of powerful vibrant echoes.

 

At first it may be hard to recognize the perfect wholeness of each Psalm, but after listening to it repeatedly it becomes evident. Every “chapter” opens with a soft sound that flowers and grows into a beautifully orchestrated harmony. Trumpets, bells, strings and other traditional instruments were used in order to achieve this melodic perfection. The somewhat metallic sound of computerized synthesizers becomes a part of this music. Until now I never cared much for computerized sounds, but the digital perfection of this work gives birth to a plethora of supernatural qualities.

Hymns of Psalms speak directly to God, begging for love and justice. Anyone who listens to this music, even without knowing what it symbolizes, will feel similar feelings of prayer. I am not certain if King David was fully aware of the musical quality that he wrote, even though he was known to be a very talented musician.

What we could not know is what God hears when we pray. We convey our prayers in Hebrew, English, Yiddish, German, Spanish, French and more and more; a blend of languages, dialects, accents, slang etc. It would be a bit childish to expect God to listen to each prayer in its source language. Now we added a new language, the language of the computer.”

The two authors, it seems, have succeeded in breaking a code that is maybe as old as the written word.

 

 

Here are several samples of his translations that I discovered.

http://www.hebrew1.com/SoundsPages/111MCDS/Psalm1.html

http://www.hebrew1.com/SoundsPages/111MCDS/PS48.html

http://www.hebrew1.com/SoundsPages/111MCDS/PS81.html

http://www.hebrew1.com/SoundsPages/111MCDS/PS23.html


 

 

Psalm 33

2/1/2018

 

Synopsis:

  • This psalm is giving praise and thanksgiving to the Creator and Preserver of this earth
  • He exclaims that God needs to be praised with musical instruments and voice
  • Make the music loud, the voice strong with new songs
  • Because the word of the Lord is right and just
  • The earth is full of examples of God’s loving kindness
  • He made the world and everything in it with the breath of His mouth
  • Let everyone in the earth stand in awe of Him, for He spoke and it was done, He commanded and it stood fast
  • Now, He looks down from His dwelling place and considers all that we do and understands us
  • His eye is upon those who love Him and He rescues their lives from eternal death
  • We are not saved by our great strength, nor our machines of war, salvation comes from the Lord
  • We are admonished to wait expectantly on Him for He is our shield and defender

 

Reaction:

 

David is reminding his listeners of the creation story and of God’s love for His creation. He wants all people to remember that we are not enduring this life alone, but we have a great God who looks after our well-being with love!

“Let Your steadfast loving kindness, O Lord, be upon us, in proportion as we have hoped in You.” Verse 22 (Amplified)

Ahh, yes! Hope, one of the great needs for human existence. The more hope that we have, the more expressions of His love we will enjoy.

 

 

 

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Are You, too, Impetuous in Following God?

Psalm 30

1/22/2018

 

Synopsis:

 

  • This is a song at the Dedication of the House of God.
  • It starts with David extolling God and praising Him for lifting him up from his deathbed.
  • He is happy that his enemies will not have the opportunity, yet, to gloat over being victorious over David.
  • He asks all the people to give glory and praise to God.
  • He reminds everyone that sometimes God gets angry and seems to turn His face from His people, but over a lifetime His people have His favor.
  • He reminds God that if he dies he will be unable to sing praises from the grave.
  • But “You have turned my morning into dancing, removed my sackcloth, so that my soul can sing your praises and not be silent.

 

Reaction:

In reading of the events of the Dedication of the House of God in 1 Chronicles 15-17 I can find no mention of David being sick or at death’s door. However, this psalm may be a reflection of his demeanor when they first tried to bring the Ark to Jerusalem. At one point the man Uzzah, when he thought the Ark was about to fall from the wagon, reached out to catch it and was struck dead by God. The procession was halted, the Ark was left at the home of Obed and the procession of people returned to Jerusalem empty-handed.

So, it is possible that David was stricken with the feeling that they were all close to death for not transporting the Ark in the prescribed manor. Three months later he assembled priests from the tribe of Levi to finish the transport in the correct manor. That trip was completed without incident. Thus, he would feel that he had escaped death and was praising God for it.

Like so many of us, we get a good idea and take off running with it, without consulting God’s input. We figure that if we have a good idea it must have come from God… which it may have, but we still must continually seek God’s input for a plan of action, for His ways are not our ways. It requires a lot of communication with God to determine the right way.

There is a long history of God’s people acting in impetuous ways to do God’s will. Abraham, David, Samson, Peter and Don are just a few of them.

 

 

Psalm 31

1/23/2018

 

Synopsis:

  • David places his confidence in the power of God to rescue him from his enemies.
  • He acknowledges God as his Rock and Strong Fortress.
  • He accepts God’s guidance and leadership.
  • “Into your hand I commit my spirit.”
  • “I hate those who pay regard to worthless idols.”
  • “I trust in the Lord with unwavering confidence.”
  • “I will rejoice and be glad in your steadfast love.”
  • He laments that his eyes are clouded with grief and his body is frail and wasting away.
  • He admits that his strength is failing because of his iniquities.
  • He laments that because of the lies of his enemies he has become a reproach and a disgrace in the neighborhood and an object of dread to his acquaintances.
  • He laments that he is forgotten like a dead man, out of mind like a broken pot.
  • He has heard the lying and scheming on every side, the plots against his life.
  • He prays that the lying lips will be hushed by their grave and that he would live on under the protection of the Lord, to continue praising God and commending Him to others.
  • “O love the Lord, all you godly people. The Lord preserve the faithful. Be strong and let your hearts take courage, all you who wait for and confidently expect the Lord.”

 

Reaction:

This is a complaint against his detractors, sandwiched between two outbursts of compliments of God for His protection and faithfulness toward His followers.

It sounds, from the tenor of the message, that this may have been written late in his life when his sons were vying for their father’s throne. Absalam was turning the hearts of the people to himself and gaining a backing for his kingship.

At one point David was cursed by a man, Shemei, as he returned from exile. As David and his men traveled the road, Shemei threw stones at David shouting, “Get out, Get out! You are a worthless, useless man of bloodshed! Now the Lord is repaying you for stealing the throne from the house of Saul.”

Shortly after Absalom was killed in battle, another of his sons actually called a coronation party and had himself crowned king to replace his father.

So it was, that Bathsheba came to David’s deathbed to remind him of his promise to her, that her son Salomon would be the next king. He mustered the strength to put into writing, who would succeed him on the throne.

It must have been terribly hard on David to accept his waning years and all the rivalry going on in his family. When he was miserably cold, someone came up with the bright idea of a beautiful maiden to sleep naked with him to provide him with body heat.

This must have been viewed by him, as a taunt of his old age, since she was young and beautiful. He was incapable of having sex with her or appreciating her beauty. The record states that, “He knew her not…” Meaning that he was not intimate with her. In my opinion, they would have done better to bring him a warm woolly sheep!

Listening for God’s Voice

Psalm 28

1/20/2018

Synopsis:

  • David begins this psalm with a plea for God to listen to his prayer and not be silent.
  • If God will not listen he fears that he will go to the grave in the same condition as the evildoers around him.
  • Again, he is telling God how to treat those evildoers, “Repay them according to the works of their hands.”
  • He rejoices that God has heard his prayer.
  • He reaffirms that God is his impenetrable shield, and his help.
  • He reaffirms that God is the one in whom he has placed his trust and confidence.
  • With his song he praises God.
  • He ends by making this a reminder to his people that God is their fortress and salvation, also.
  • He ends with a plea for God to be their blessing and shepherd who will carry them forever.

 

Reaction:

At first glance it seems like he is again in a position of telling God what to do with his wicked enemies. But perhaps he is just making suggestions to God based on what He has done to his enemies in times past.

I guess this is actually a prayer for help or deliverance from his enemies and then he praises God for answering his prayer BEFORE God has done anything!

Now, THAT is confidence and trust in God.

How many times have I prayed for something or some action and then arose to wait to see if He would do it?

Wrong attitude. With my supplication I need to remember to thank Him for answering my prayer, before God makes His first move.


 

 

Psalm 29

1/20/2018

 

Synopsis:

  • David here is telling the Sons of the Mighty to acknowledge that God is the God of glory and strength.
  • Worship the God of glory, majesty, and holiness for He is the source of holiness.
  • He cites many examples of the strength of Gods voice as shown in nature.
  • He even created everything that we see around us.
  • Then He sat as King at the flood, yes, He sits as King forever.
  • He will bless His people forever.

 

Reaction:

Few people can see the works of God’s voice in the things that He made with His voice. At creation He spoke and it was done. Yet so many people choose to believe that the things around us just happened.

Six thousand years later when He speaks, it is still done. But how many people recognize that the interactions that we observe in nature are a result of His spoken directions?

One man shows us a different view of nature “singing God’s love. Check it out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=helxFeG-0n0

For instance, our “scientists” speak of global warming as though it is something bad that we have done to “nature.” Like it is something that we have any control over. I see it as something that God has created as part of the circle of life as we now experience it, after Adam and Eve broke their relationship with their loving Creator.

David listened to God’s voice through nature, and so can we.

Praising God in the “Great Congregation”

Psalm 26

01/18/2018

Synopsis:

  • David proclaims his trust in God.
  • He asks God to examine his life and test his loyalty.
  • “I will wash my hands in innocence: so will I circle your alter; That I may make the voice of thanksgiving to be heard.”
  • “I will walk in mine integrity: Redeem me, and be merciful unto me.”
  • “In the congregations will I bless Jehovah.”

 

Reaction:

David seems to be oriented around a “works” driven life. He claims to have lived a blameless life, when in reality ( read 2 Samuel ) one can easily see that this is not true.

We must be careful what we pray for, because God will surely answer those prayers. “I have trusted in the Lord and have not faltered.” “Test me and try me, O Lord, examine my heart and my mind.”

Ah yes, he WAS tested and tried! I will have to concede that he was about as faithful to God, on a relationship level, as anyone can be. That is why he always is asking for forgiveness for his behavior.

After listing all the bad things that he does NOT do and the good things that he DOES do, he prays that he won’t be lumped in with the wicked men and women in the great judgment.

He says, “I lead a blameless life,” and yet he adds, “deliver me and be merciful to me.”

I have recently been introduced to the relationship side of God with the explanation, “It’s not what you do, but who you know that will get us into heaven with eternal life.”

David lived a very real and “earthy” life. He made a lot of mistakes and would probably not be a candidate for baptism into most Christian churches today, but he had an enviable relationship with God. Isn’t that what God wants from any of His creation?

When Jesus was describing the scenes of the final judgment, he told of the people who did all these great works in the name of God. But God says, “Get out of my sight, I don’t know you.” They had spent so much time doing good things for God that they hadn’t taken time to develop a relationship with the God for whom they were doing all those good things.

He said, “I don’t know you,” but it would make more sense to me if he had said, “You don’t know Me.”

So, because David did a lot of bad things as well as a lot good things, he always seemed to be asking for deliverance and mercy. But he had a relationship with God that would be the envy of generations to come, including Jesus, who proclaimed him to be “a man after God’s own heart.”

That’s what I want for my life! I want to exclaim with David, “In the great congregation I will praise the Lord.”


 

Psalm 27

1/19/2018

Synopsis:

  • This is a psalm of fearless trust in God.
  • He proclaims God to be his fortress and refuge against his enemies.
  • When the wicked came against him to eat his flesh, they stumbled and fell.
  • His heart will not tremble with fear when armies are camped against him.
  • He is asking for just one thing, that he may live in the presence of God all the days of his life.
  • In the day of trouble God hides him in the secret place of his tent.
  • His parents have abandoned him (or left, or died?).
  • He longs to be taught of God and live an easy life.
  • He would have despaired had he not believed that he would see God “in the land of the living.”
  • He encourages others to “Wait for and confidently expect the Lord; Be strong and let your heart take courage”.

 

Reaction:

It is strange that as I started reading this psalm the question popped into my head, “Whatever happened to David’s family?”

I don’t recall that they are ever mentioned after Samuel visits to select a new king for Israel… except in genealogies. And this was before I got to the part of his mother and father abandoning him.

The line about his enemies coming to “eat his flesh” rather jumped out at me, too, since I have been reading a lot about giants in our early history of civilization. They were supposed to have been cannibals. Goliath, whom David killed as a youth, may have been the one whom this psalm references. Goliath also had several brothers, also giants who ran away when Goliath hit the dirt on the battlefield. One by one in later battles, the four remaining four brothers are mentioned as being killed.

David’s trust in God’s safe-haven began at a very young age.

“In the day of trouble God hides him in the secret place of his tent.”

This may have been a reference to the time when David and his rebel band were fleeing for days and slipped into the tent-temple to eat and drink the temple food.

I love that he encourages others with these words, “Wait for and confidently expect the Lord; Be strong and let your heart take courage.” He wants others to enjoy the same kind of relationship with the Lord that enjoys.

 

 

We are no Match for the devil

Psalm 24

1/15/2018

 

Synopsis:

  • In typical form, David recognizes the Creator of the world and everything in it.
  • Then he asks who can join God or be on par with Him.
  • And he answers his own question, “One who has clean hands and a pure heart and does not trust in idols.” ( One who has a good relationship with Him)
  • Then the focus shifts to what appears to be a chorus that is repeated twice. With only a slight variation.

 

Reaction:

“Lift up your heads, you gates;

be lifted up, you ancient doors,

that the King of glory may come in.

Who is this King of glory?

The Lord strong and mighty,

The Lord mighty in battle.”

 

Obviously, there is some symbolism going on here, because we have inanimate objects, gates and doors, with heads to be lifted up. Perhaps it is a representation of a people in fortification mode against evil or the devil …in lock-down mode. He is asking people to drop the fortifications and let the King of glory in. With the King inside your fortress within you, you won’t need those fortifications, because He is mighty and strong, and will bring a certain victory.

We are no match for the devil, but God is, the Lord Almighty.


 

Psalm 25

1/17/2018

Synopsis:

  • David declares his trust in God.
  • Asks several times that he not be put to shame.
  • Asks that his enemies not triumph over him.
  • Asks for guidance and an education in God’s ways.
  • Longs to know truth. Since God IS truth, he is longing to know more about God.
  • Asks for forgiveness for the sins of his youth.
  • Acknowledges that God is loving and faithful.
  • Confesses that all who fear the Lord can be instructed by Him.
  • He confesses that he is lonely and afflicted.
  • He confesses his anguish and distress.
  • He puts his hope of deliverance in the Lord.

 

Reaction:

I suspect that this psalm was written near the end of his life when the people of God were divided, the southern group from the northern group. Even his sons were rebelling him. Absolom, his favorite, and perhaps his oldest, has tried to wow the people away from his dad’s leadership, and was killed in battle. The next in line declares himself king while David was languishing on his deathbed.

So, not only are his enemies found outside of Israel, but they are within his family. Is it any wonder that he prays that he “…be not put to shame.”

He also prays, “May integrity and uprightness protect me, because my hope, Lord, is in you.”

His final word in this psalm is for others, “Deliver Israel, O God, from all their troubles.” In this case the “troubles” may have arisen from the political intrigue going on within the palace.

 

 

Why Do You Have Fears?

Psalm 22

1/2/2018

 

 

Synopsis:

  • This seems to be a prophetic psalm that is more about the life of the coming Messiah than about the life of David.
  • Indeed, the very first line, “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?” is quoted by Jesus from the cross.
  • He continues to cry out for help from the Lord.
  • All of his ancestors have called out to God asking for deliverance and their prayers were answered. They were not put to shame.
  • But, he claims, “I am a worm, not a man and am scorned by everyone.”
  • “He trusts in God,” they say with wagging heads, “Let his God deliver him.”
  • Reiterating his trust in the Lord he claims, “From birth I was cast on you; from my mother’s womb you have been my God.”
  • Then follows what seems at first glance to be several verses of hyperbole, followed by lines that stand out in stark reality to the crucifixion scene.
  • ”I am poured out like water.”
  • “My mouth is dried up.”
  • “My tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth.”
  • “.. a pack of villains encircles me; they pierce my hands and feet.”
  • “They divide my clothes among them and cast lots for my garments.”
  • All the people of the earth will remember what he has done and will worship Him.
  • All posterity will serve Him and tell of the Lord to the next generations.

 

 

Reaction:

Wow! What’s with these old guys? How do they get to talk to God and get audible answers and have such clear revelations about events that they will never witness in their lifetime?

In the case of this psalm, one wonders if David was allowed to stand at the foot of the cross and view the events. Jesus was a diligent scholar of scriptures, so it would be nothing for him to quote from this psalm’s first line, but Jesus would probably not construct some of the events that were involving other people. So, it is with a little awe that we read such vivid descriptive lines as, “They divide my clothing amongst themselves and cast lots for my garment.” Or, “They pierced my hands and feet.” And, “All my bones are out of joint,” as only hanging on a cross can affect the body.

Words like, “All who see me laugh at me and mock me; they insultingly open their lips, they shake their head, saying ‘He trusted and committed himself to the Lord, now let God save him.’ And, “My mouth is dried up like broken pottery, and my tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth.” Words written in the first person, present tense would indicate to me, that he was watching these chilling last moments of Christ’s sacrifice on the cross for humanity as though it were happening to him hanging there above his tormentors.

He proclaims, “All the ends of the earth will remember (this moment in time) and turn to the Lord…. And bow down before Him… future generations will be told about the Lord. They will proclaim His righteousness, declaring to a people yet unborn: He has done it! (It is finished!).”

In my day, though, David would be considered a sanctimonious ass with way too many wives, concubines (household whores) and too much blood on his hands to even belong to the church that I attend. Yet, he was much closer to God than I could ever hope to be.

Oh that I were this close to God!


 

 

Psalm 23

1/09/2018

 

Synopsis:

  • David, in this psalm, uses the analogy of sheep and shepherding to illustrate his life and God’s care.
  • God’s provisions for his physical needs are covered.
  • His live is not wanting, or lacking anything.
  • He has a safe place to sleep, food to eat and water to drink.
  • He is guided by his Shepherd along right paths.
  • Even if those paths lead to some scary places he has the Shepherd’s protection.
  • His Shepherd protects and blesses him in full view of his enemies.
  • With assurance, he proclaims, “God’s goodness and mercy will follow me all the days of my life.”
  • “When it is all over, I will dwell in the house of the Lord for eternity.”

 

Reaction:

Having only had dealings with sheep for a short period of my life, I can understand why David used this analogy, other than the fact that he spent a lot of time in his youth as a shepherd.

Sheep, in my opinion, are smelly, unruly critters that are easily frightened. When they are frightened they tend to bolt in any direction, following the leader of their hierarchy. Using a shepherd’s crook, a shepherd can reach out over the flock to snag the neck of the wayward leader and thus bring the whole flock into line.

I think that one of the reasons Jesus called David “A man after God’s own heart,” was because he continually gave public recognition to and thanks for the help that God gave him daily.

I thank God, that He is pleased when we give Him such thanks for the things He does for us.

Another example of this is found in the story of Job. When the writer of Job was given insight into the inner working of the universe he saw that all the representatives of God’s creation were gathered together at a meeting. During “role call” Satan was asked, “Where do you come from?”

“From roaming around the earth that I usurped from mankind,” he replied.

“Ah-h-h yes, God said with a grin. “Have you noticed my buddy, Job? He doesn’t follow after you.”

Yes. I added that part about the grin, because I think that God was genuinely proud that Job would be loyal to Him when there was so much evil in the world to lead him astray.

Job, like David, was lead through some pretty dark days without understanding why. They were his Death Valley Days. Yet, he remained true to God even though he had no idea why God was no longer providing His accustomed protection.

If you haven’t yet experienced those Death Valley Days, trust me, they will be there sometime before you die. If we continue to “hang tight” to our faith in Jesus, we have nothing to fear.

Telling God how to Handle Your Problems?

Psalm 21

12/31/2017

 

Synopsis:

  • This psalm seems to be written late in David’s life, for at one point he tells of asking the Lord for the “good life” and praises God for receiving a “long life as a bonus.”
  • He continues to acknowledge God as his strength and the giver of just the gifts he wanted.
  • Following the common thread of many of his psalms, he either has had a God-dream or vision of what is to become of his enemies, or he just gets really “creative” in telling God what he WANTS done to his enemies
  • He wants his enemies gathered up in the vengeful fists of God and have them thrown into the fire. Plus, he wants all their offspring purged from the earth
  • “Show your strength, Lord, so no one can miss it,” he sings

 

Reaction:

This, like many of his psalms, is written in the third person. It’s like he is tooting his own horn. Or, he is writing these psalms about himself, to be sung in public by others, as if they were spontaneous lyrics that highlight his experiences.


 

Psalm 22

1/2/2018

 

 

Synopsis:

  • This seems to be a prophetic psalm that is more about the life of the coming Messiah than about the life of David.
  • Indeed, the very first line, “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?” is quoted by Jesus from the cross.
  • He continues to cry out for help from the Lord.
  • All of his ancestors have called out to God asking for deliverance and their prayers were answered. They were not put to shame.
  • But, he claims, “I am a worm, not a man and am scorned by everyone.”
  • “He trusts in God,” they say with wagging heads, “Let his God deliver him.”
  • Reiterating his trust in the Lord he claims, “From birth I was cast on you; from my mother’s womb you have been my God.”
  • Then follows what seems at first glance to be several verses of hyperbole, followed by lines that stand out in stark reality to the crucifixion scene.
  • ”I am poured out like water.”
  • “My mouth is dried up.”
  • “My tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth.”
  • “.. a pack of villains encircles me; they pierce my hands and feet.”
  • “They divide my clothes among them and cast lots for my garments.”
  • All the people of the earth will remember what he has done and will worship Him.
  • All posterity will serve Him and tell of the Lord to the next generations.

 

 

Reaction:

Wow! What’s with these old guys? How do they get to talk to God and get audible answers and have such clear revelations about events that they will never witness in their lifetime?

In the case of this psalm, one wonders if David was allowed to stand at the foot of the cross and view the events. Jesus was a diligent scholar of scriptures, so it would be nothing for him to quote from this psalm’s first line, but Jesus would probably not construct some of the events that were involving other people. So, it is with a little awe that we read such vivid descriptive lines as, “They divide my clothing amongst themselves and cast lots for my garment.” Or, “They pierced my hands and feet.” And, “All my bones are out of joint,” as only hanging on a cross can affect the body.

Words like, “All who see me laugh at me and mock me; they insultingly open their lips, they shake their head, saying ‘He trusted and committed himself to the Lord, now let God save him.’ And, “My mouth is dried up like broken pottery, and my tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth.” Words written in the first person, present tense would indicate to me, that he was watching these chilling last moments of Christ’s sacrifice on the cross for humanity as though it were happening to him hanging there above his tormentors.

He proclaims, “All the ends of the earth will remember (this moment in time) and turn to the Lord…. And bow down before Him… future generations will be told about the Lord. They will proclaim His righteousness, declaring to a people yet unborn: He has done it! (It is finished!).”

In my day, David would be considered a sanctimonious ass with way too many wives, concubines (household whores) and too much blood on his hands to even belong to the church that I attend. Yet, he was much closer to God than I could ever hope to be. Oh that I could be this close to God.